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TTC Video The Age of Henry VIII Prof Dale Hoak
TTC Video The Age of Henry VIII Prof Dale Hoak avi|3.91 GB


TTC Video – The Age of Henry VIII [Prof. Dale Hoak] avi

The Teaching Company – Course No. 8467

This king, as one of his recent biographers has noted, “changed the heart, mind, and face of Britain more than anything between the coming of the Normans and the coming of the factory,” not least by giving Protestantism its powerful purchase in the English-speaking world. And given Britain’s later significance in world history—made possible in part by Henry himself—he must be accounted a towering figure of history.

Henry’s reign contributed an important legacy to British history and the modern world: the revolutionary effect of the Act of Appeals was to make law itself, or the king-in-Parliament, the supreme authority. Parliamentary law became the basis of the new constitutional monarchy; the tax schemes of Henry’s lord chancellor, Wolsey, would presage the beginning of modern bureaucracy; and Henry’s navy was the first standing military force in his day.

Henry VIII was an athlete who surrendered to self-indulgence. He was a romantic who is remembered for his failed marriages and his cruelty toward at least four of his six wives. He combined exquisite taste and aesthetic sensibility (he was a superb singer) with a vulgar acquisitiveness. He was a trained theologian with a tender conscience who turned on the church for none-too-lofty reasons. He recruited awesomely talented advisors to help him with his plans, only to destroy the greatest of them.

Each of Henry’s wives was a figure of drama and interest in her own right. One was a giddy, sexy teenager; another was a sharp political player who became the first queen of England to publish a book. One made Henry court her for seven years and had her coronation turned into the largest spectacle ever staged by the ceremony-loving Tudor dynasty; another Henry married sight unseen and then hastily rejected, ranting, “I like her not!” Still another became a member of the truly tiny club of people who upbraided Royal Henry to his face (publicly!) and lived to tell about it.

Here is a short list of facts from these lectures:
• What Henry did with the fabulous wealth that he gained from his seizure and dissolution of England’s monasteries—there were more than 800, and the takeover involved fully one-quarter of the best land in all England
• Why a law that Henry put through Parliament in 1533 (Act of Appeals) is more important to the history of constitutional development in the English-speaking world than even Magna Carta, and how Henry became an early (if unwilling) sponsor of free speech
• How Henry’s reaction to a sensational 1514 London murder case prefigured a break with Rome decades later
• What it would have been like to visit Henry at court and see the king in the midst of both his business and his many and extravagant amusements.
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